Six Pixels of Separation - The Blog
December 12, 201711:02 PM

Do We Blame The Algorithms When Advertising Goes Wrong?

When things go wrong in advertising, it looks like brands are throwing the algorithms under the bus.

And you thought it was just the agencies who took the brunt of the damage when mistakes are made? It is not. Look no further than Internet Radio to see how this is unfolding. Internet radio has consistently been an area of high growth in advertising spend (and based on the success of podcasts, connected speakers, voice platforms and the troubles of terrestrial radio, it doesn't look like it is going to be slowing down any time soon). Still, Internet Radio is not podcasting. In fact, it works almost exactly like terrestrial radio. It has scheduled programming, measurable audience, and time slot ad buys. The big difference (or value for brands) is the simplicity of digital insertions (the publishers can drop ads in and out with ease across multiple shows over date and time). But, there's one fatal flaw that many brands haven't considered: it's largely a wild west on the content front. Without knowing it, many brands are unwittingly sponsoring some fairly unsavory shows including those supporting racism or even terrorist thinking. So, is this a wake up call about the medium or another example of marketer laziness with programmatic buying? How should brands proceed? Is it easier to keep making the same mistake over and over again (while blaming the algorithms) or do we have a deeper problem going on here?

You may want to listen to this: Beancast - Episode #476 - So Very Gassy.

This week, I discussed this topic along with Emily Binder (Beetle Moment Marketing), Kate O'Neill (K.O.Insights) and host Bob Knorpp on the very excellent BeanCast Podcast (which I've been fortunate to be a guest on in the past). We didn't just tackle the current problem of Internet Radio advertising. In this episode, we also discussed brands and their inability to truly be friends in social media, ads.cert and what this means for the digital advertising business, and Facebook's new Messenger For Kids apps. 

Take a listen and jump into the fray...

By Mitch Joel

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December 10, 2017 7:30 AM

Future Proof With Minter Dial - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Episode #595 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to.

Back in early 2002, when I first got started in this agency business, I was networking as much as possible. One of the first major local executives that I met was Minter Dial. A man with an international reputation who was senior leadership at L'Oreal. We became friends, but Minter moved on. I believe that Minter and I bonded so well, because we were both interested in very divergent cultural spaces, while developing very corporate lives at the same time. To give you some context, Minter Dial is an American, with French citizenship, born in Belgium, educated in England, living in France and married with two children. He is the author and producer of the award-winning documentary film and book, The Last Ring Home. A personal and moving story that traces the lives of his grandfather and grandmother through WWII. The film, which has won multiple awards, including Best Foreign Film, Best Documentary and Best Screenplay, was shown on PBS in May of this year. On the professional front - after a 16-year international career with the L'Oréal Group -- including nine assignments in France, UK, USA and Canada -- Minter launched The Myndset Company, a boutique agency providing business speaking and consultancy on leadership, branding and digital strategy. Most recently, Minter co-authored (with Caleb Storkey), Futureproof - How to get your business ready for the next disruption. The book explores the three core mindsets and twelve disruptive technologies that brands must have to grow and succeed... and to get ready for the next disruption. Enjoy the conversation...   

You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #595.

By Mitch Joel

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December 9, 2017 5:37 AM

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #389

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for InterestingTilt the WindmillHBS, chair of StrataStartupfestPandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see".

Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another: 

  • Postmortem: Every Frame a Painting - Tony Zhou - Medium. "The YouTube channel Every Frame A Painting has been doing visual storytelling for years now. And, with this post, they wrapped things up. 'My name is Tony and my name is Taylor, and this concludes Every Frame a Painting.' I hadn't been following their story, but if you're a creative type working today, this is a fascinating read -- and I have a few hours of videos to catch up on." (Alistair for Hugh).
  • I Made My Shed the Top Rated Restaurant On TripAdvisor - Vice. "If true, this is a scathing indictment of ratings sites. If not, it's the best example of trolling I've seen on the Internet in recent years. Either way, you need to see this -- if only for the behind-the-scenes photos of food staging." (Alistair for Mitch).
  • Is There a Limit to Scientific Understanding? - The Atlantic. "Science is still pretty bad at describing real complexity, and still terrible at explaining our own brains. Maybe that's a constraint of human consciousness, and a limit of our ability to truly understand the world around us." (Hugh for Alistair).
  • Kick Against the Pricks - The New York Review of Books. "Laura Kipnis pulls no punches in this snarky and wise overview of the spate of powerful men falling on their, er, swords. The article is more remarkable in its shading beyond black and white." (Hugh for Mitch). 
  • Ambient AI Is About to Devour the Software Industry - Technology Review. "Amazon. Oh, Amazon. When you mix artificial intelligence and machine learning into cloud platforms, something really big is/will happen. Not enough people get it, understand it or are ready for the ramifications. From this article: 'This shift promises to be the biggest transition for the software world in decades. The easy availability of on-demand machine learning, combined with tools for automating the design and training of AI models, should, in fact, have an increasing impact on overall economic productivity, according to some economists.' It's not about new software. Not at all. As the article surmises: '...cloud-based machine learning is about to take the software industry by storm--and, by extension, to rewire the entire economy.' Yes, the entire economy." (Mitch for Alistair).
  • 'Let the soul dangle': how mind-wandering spurs creativity - Aeon. "If all you are ever doing is transitioning from deep work into a Facebook feed, into YouTube, into dinner, into Netflix and beyond, you are busy trying to fill your day. Being active is so important. No doubt. But what about just letting your mind wander? How about just giving yourself a beat... a long beat... a long walk... or just do nothing. Literally, nothing. Not even a meditation or mindfulness session. Nothing. Just put your mind out on a clothesline and do nothing until it dries. What could happen? Perhaps... maybe... a massive breakthrough?" (Mitch for Hugh). 

Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play.

By Mitch Joel

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December 7, 201710:54 PM

The Legendary John Patitucci On This Month's Groove - The No Treble Podcast

John Patitucci is this month's conversation on Groove - The No Treble Podcast.

You can listen the new episode right here: Groove - The No Treble Podcast - Episode #36 - John Patitucci.

Who is John Patitucci?

What has not been said about the bass playing of John Patitucci? The Brooklyn native started playing the bass when he was twelve years old and has not stopped since. He was a member of three Chick Corea groups: the Elektric Band, the Akoustic Band, and the quartet. While he often switches between the acoustic and electric bass, most of us know him for his groundbreaking work with the six string bass. Patitucci truly is the triple threat: a killer live performer, an amazing studio musician, and a much sought-after teacher. He was the artistic director of the Bass Collective, was involved with the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz, he started the Online Jazz Bass School, and was more recently appointed artist in residence at Berklee College of Music. In 2015, the documentary Back In Brooklyn came out and covered not only the recording of his solo disc, Brooklyn, but it was a phenomenal look back on his incredible career. John is busier than ever these days. The multi-Grammy winner most recently toured with The John Patitucci Electric Guitar Quartet, which happened around the same time as the 2015 recording of another trio, Children of the Light. We're honored that John took the time to chat with us. Enjoy the conversation...

Listen in: Groove - The No Treble Podcast - Episode #36 - John Patitucci.

What is Groove - The No Treble Podcast?

This is an ambitious effort. This will be a fascinating conversation. Our goal at Groove is to build the largest oral history of bass players. Why Groove? Most of the content about the bass revolves around gear, playing techniques, and more technical chatter. For us, bassists are creative artists with stories to tell. They are a force to be reckon with. These are the stories and conversation that we will capture. To create this oral history of why these artists chose the bass, what their creative lives are like, and where inspiration can be found.

By Mitch Joel

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December 3, 2017 6:45 AM

Into The Speaker Lab With Grant Baldwin - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Episode #594 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to.

The number one question that people ask me is: how did you become a professional speaker? I don't believe that my story is replicable. Not because I am special (I am not). I just had many lucky breaks happen together in a short period of time. Here's one thing that I have learned over the years: the best speakers do not just get up on stage and deliver. They are not individuals with birth-given skills. The ability to communicate to an audience (and, that's anyone from the boardroom to the convention centre) is a learnable skill. Grant Baldwin does this for a living. A former Bible college youth pastor, Grant now helps people become speakers... and become better speakers. His company, The Speaker Lab, has a whole mess of tools, podcasts, workshops, training and more (including his free speaker workshop and free speaker fee calculator). In this episode, we break it down for anyone and everyone who wants to deliver in front of an audience. And, whether you eagerly want to get up on stage or are dreading it, the skillset of public speaking is critical to your success (and your brand's). Enjoy the conversation... 

You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #594.

By Mitch Joel

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December 2, 2017 5:48 AM

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #388

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks,... Read more

By Mitch Joel

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November 29, 2017 2:26 PM

Mini Gift Guide For The Tech Traveller's Business Person In Your Life

Normally, I shy away from gift guides. This year is different. I travel about 150,000 miles per year (for some that's insane, for other that's called "February"). With that, I am always super specific about the gear that I travel... Read more

By Mitch Joel

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November 27, 2017 8:54 AM

Holiday Tech Gift Guide And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the... Read more

By Mitch Joel

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November 26, 2017 7:20 AM

Secrets For Powerful Communications With Julian Treasure - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Episode #594 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. Sometimes lightning strikes, and you get lucky. There is no question that this is, exactly, what happened to me... Read more

By Mitch Joel

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November 25, 2017 5:30 AM

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #387

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks,... Read more

By Mitch Joel

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